In The News

Blockchain for 3D Printing

GE – Blockchain for 3D Printing?

Even the oldest companies in the world are getting into crypto…

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Posted in Business

3D Printing Trade Association News – How Do You Manage Multiple 3D Printers?

It’s interesting. Most firms that have embraced 3D Printing did not have a 3D Printing strategy. We find that 3D Printing was often adopted in a piecemeal way. One department would get a 3D Printer. A new sales person would arrive, and a company buys a different 3D Printer. Over time, you get an enterprise with many types of printers.

This has it’s pros and cons. On the pro side, you aren’t locked into one manufacturer, and can see which machine works best for your firm. The cons however mean that firms have to learn many software programs to manage the machines. This “soft cost” isn’t soft at all…the staffing can cost more than the cost of the machines themselves! Association member 3D Printer OS has a solution. A SaaS based platform that is technology agnostic. By being neutral as far as machine choices, 3D Printer OS can mange all of the 3D Printers, thus reducing cost, manpower and confusion.

As 3D Printing matures, more and more firms will be searching for machine agnostic solutions.

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Posted in Announcements, Manufacturing, Software

3D Printing Trade Association’s Latest 3D Printing Podcast

This latest 3D Printing podcasts discusses intellectual property theft and how it relates to 3D Printing. Listen to the latest 3D Printing Podcast

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Posted in Announcements, Ideas

3D Printing Trade Association News – Israeli Scientists 3D Print A Human Heart!

In what the Israeli media is calling a “world’s first,” scientists at Tel Aviv University have 3D printed a small heart using human tissue that includes vessels, collagen, and biological molecules — a breakthrough, according to Haaretz, that they hope could one day render organ donation obsolete.

The technology is still many years out from human transplants, though — the team’s rodent-sized printed heart isn’t quite there yet.

“The cells need to form a pumping ability; they can currently contract, but we need them to work together,” lead scientist Tal Dvir told Haaretz. “This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart complete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” Dvir said. Take a look at this 3D Printing video to see it.

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Posted in Announcements, Bioprinting

3D Printing News – More On Nasa And 3D Printing

NASA once again is embracing 3D printing. Auburn University’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering announced that NASA has awarded a three-year, $5.2 million contract to its National Center for Additive Manufacturing Excellence, or NCAME, to develop additive manufacturing processes and techniques to boost liquid rocket engines performance. The contract is the latest expansion of a longstanding public-private partnership between Auburn and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. The best news about this project is that the technologies developed by this team will be made available widely to the private sector, offering more companies the opportunity to use these advanced manufacturing techniques. This is per Paul McConnaughey, deputy director of Marshall Space Flight Center.

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Posted in Engineering, NASA

Metal Jet Production Service Launched By HP – A Service Bureau For Metal!

HP has announced the launch of its Metal Jet Production Service, enabling customers to upload designs and produce production-grade additively manufactured metal parts in large quantities. The parts are produced by HP partners GKN Powder Metallurgy and Parmatech, using HP’s Metal Jet systems.

This is great news for companies who want to try 3D Printing or even use it continuously, but not invest in the printers or training themselves.

The Metal Jet Production Service allows customers to upload their design file through the HP website. The HP team perform design compatibility checks to ensure suitability for its Metal Jet Additive Manufacturing technology. Once confirmed, the customer is connected to one of HP’s trusted third-party manufacturing partners to fulfil the order.

“As we continue to expand our plastics and metals portfolio across both prototyping and production, and build out our community of global partners, we are helping customers save money, accelerate time to market, and improve sustainability as they progress on their digital manufacturing journey,” stated Christoph Schell, President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing, HP Inc.

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Posted in Announcements, Engineering

3D Printing Trade Association Looks At NASA And 3D Printing

Does 3D Printing in Space make NASA’s job easier?

The 3D Printing In Zero-G Technology Demonstration (3D Printing In Zero-G) experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. In general, a 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the International Space Station is the first step towards establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Space station or manufacturing plant? Three-dimensional printing offers a fast and inexpensive way to manufacture parts on-site and on-demand, a huge benefit to long-term missions with restrictions on weight and room for cargo. After testing of hardware for 3D printing on parabolic flights from Earth resulted in parts similar to those made on the ground, the next step was testing aboard the space station. The test included printing items designed by students and results showed that 3D printers work normally in space. This work will contribute to establishing on-demand manufacturing on long space missions and improving 3D printing methods on the ground.

3D printing serves as a fast and inexpensive way to manufacture parts on-site and on-demand, reducing the need for costly spares on the International Space Station and future spacecraft. Long-term missions would benefit greatly from having onboard manufacturing capabilities. Data and experience gathered in this demonstration improve future 3-dimensional manufacturing technology and equipment for the space program, allowing a greater degree of autonomy and flexibility for astronauts.

Read the full article from NASA here

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Posted in Announcements, NASA

3D Printing Trade Association Quotes 3D Printing Book

6 More 3D Printing Myths!

Myth #6: The labor unions will never allow a “no labor” manufacturing process. These unions are powerful and have members everywhere. There is no way they will allow products to be made without their hard work and input.

Myth #7: Holders of intellectual property will get ripped off and not paid for their designs. If I can put a CAD file into the cloud, or email it to someone, why would anyone pay for it? Just like pirating movies, software, Internet news and books ….no one will pay for what they can get for free.

Myth #8: Computer automated design drawings are too big, too clunky, and take too long to download. This isn’t a simple word processing file, it’s an entire product design. It will take up a lot of space and most of us don’t have a fast enough Internet connection to get the files.

Myth #9: Most government agencies will not approve of any parts made by 3D printing. Governments have regulations which protect its citizens. If anyone with a 3D printer can start making junk and selling it, who will regulate it? Are you saying someone can print out a car part and just install it in a car? What if the part fails and there is an accident?

Myth #10: This will never be in reach of the common man. Machines are too expensive. Set up is too difficult. Supplies aren’t easy to get. Some of the 3D printing is about toys and games, but other applications seem to be about bones and eyeballs and airplane parts. It can’t get to all of us.

Myth #11: There is no demand for 3D- printed products. With Ecommerce, we can find anything we want on the Internet, order it, and have it in our hands in 1 day. Who is in a bigger rush than that?

Get the 3D Printing Book!

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Posted in Announcements, Business

3D Printing With NASA Using The Technology

3D printing has been taking on industry after industry. One can even 3D print food to some extent. Now researchers funded by NASA will apply that technology and manufacturing approach to print sensors and even a partial circuitry for wireless communication on a single board that’s no larger than your phone.

Multisensor platforms used by scientists both on earth and in space are traditionally made like any piece of electronics today. Each of the different kinds of sensors are built separately and then integrated with other components on the board. The process is not only painstaking but also introduces opportunities for errors somewhere along the assembly line.

The 3D printing technology that Mahmooda Sultana and her team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center are working on will simplify both the production and the packaging of these essential platforms. Using nanomaterials, like carbon nanotubes, graphene, etc., they will print all the necessary sensors on the same substrate all in a single process. They might even be able to 3D print a part of the wireless communication circuitry needed for the platform to communicate the data to ground controllers.

Read the full article here:

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Posted in Announcements, Education, Industry Stats, NASA

3D Printing Trade News – 3D Printing Is Good Enough For Sports Cars

Lamborghini has unveiled its first end-use components to be manufactured with Digital Light Synthesis (DLS) technology.

The Italian automotive brand has harnessed 3D printing to produce a new textured fuel cover cap and a clip component for an air duct for its SUV model, brought to market last year. Amazon news, as quality and workmanship is key for this firm.

Lamborghini has been working in collaboration with not only Carbon, but also Volkswagen’s Electronic Research Lab as it looks to redesign parts primarily in the interior of vehicles to reduce weight and improve durability. Carbon’s DLS printing systems are helping to facilitate this additive production at scale, while its Epoxy 82material has been highlighted as an enabler to deliver more durable parts that are able to withstand high pressure and high temperature requirements.

Teaming the capabilities of Carbon’s 3D printing technology with the experience within the VW Electronic Research Lab has allowed Lamborghini to put 3D printed parts on one of its Super SUVs models, and the company is confident there is more to come. It looks like 3D Printing won’t really have a problem matching the high quality components demanded by luxury manufacturers.

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Posted in Engineering, International